Because I somehow never posted this yet, here is the complete animation I did for my residency back in April at Struts Gallery: Communique No. 1, a short stop-motion animation created through repetitive printing of a wood block.

Several months later, here is the final mockup of the vinyl text used in the last show I was in, Building Relationships With Cinderblocks at Eyelevel Gallery in Halifax, NS. As of right now, I don’t have any photographs of the finished installation, which was up from June 8 - July 7, 2012. Lesson: always, always, always document your own work, even if you are told that a photographer will be documenting everything for a show publication.

Several months later, here is the final mockup of the vinyl text used in the last show I was in, Building Relationships With Cinderblocks at Eyelevel Gallery in Halifax, NS. As of right now, I don’t have any photographs of the finished installation, which was up from June 8 - July 7, 2012. Lesson: always, always, always document your own work, even if you are told that a photographer will be documenting everything for a show publication.

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(Family Division)

The following is an experimental ghazal using text cobbled from Supreme Court divorce transcripts. This is only one of a number of arrangements of similar text using this form, but this is the one that I think is currently the most successful. Please tell me what you think.

She presents a version of their relationship: of isolation
and estrangement from her family and anyone else outside their home.

Should there be an equal division?
Parents do not often show the good sense of their children.

He testified that she was alcoholic, addicted
to gambling devices and spent most of her time on the computer.

There was a bitter separation:
M.’s answers suggested disturbed family relationships.

Sexual relations had been sporadic for a number of years
and finally ceased on December 1, 1995.

He would “take her back” if she resolved these issues -
What has changed since William, J.’s decision?

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"I knew John Thompson. He was my teacher and friend at Mount Allison. We went trout fishing together once. He had a canoe and we fished somewhere up in back of Silver Lake. In the late afternoon he suddenly insisted that we paddle to shore and then he ran off through the woods. It was a Saturday and he’d forgotten to buy his grog for the weekend from the Sackville liquor store. Hours later he came back for me and the canoe in the dark. “That was close” he said."

Mike Robertson commenting on poet John Thompson

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Here is the finished installation for my residency, latex paint & vinyl lettering, May 2012.

Part of an ongoing series titled ‘it’s a hoax!’.

Anthony Burrill
—
True words. I’m working on a piece for an upcoming show at Eyelevel Gallery (opening reception June 7th!) and trying to reacquaint myself with the notion of deadlines. This is the first time I’ve worked towards a deadline since I graduated university, and it’s bringing up all sorts of old problems & exciting pressures (I think I work well this way). There is nothing quite like the feeling of jumping into a project headfirst with a half-formed notion of what the finished product is going to look like and knowing you have, essentially, a few days to see it through to a completed state.
I’ve been dredging old public record family court transcripts for material for this piece (depressing, don’t ever do this if you get sad as easily as I do) in an attempt to use my own curatorial ‘voice’ to present legalese and court evidence through a poetic narrative. The show’s curator is looking for me to display this in a similar fashion to other text pieces that I’ve done - paired with large and colourful painted images - but I’m hitting a roadblock in terms of how to proceed with sourcing my image.
My work up until this point has relied on punchy one-liners, ambiguous one-off slogans that are meant to act as a kind of sticky non-sequitur. They are meant to be brief, temporal, and varying degrees of esoteric. For these reasons, the colourful, “seductive” (someone else’s words, not mine - but I’ll take it) images work as a successful complement to the text. The images are bold and large and colourful but are also basic, pared down representations, painted sparely, as equally simple and on-their-surface staightforward as the text.
However, the text for this piece is longer, more complex in its construction/presentation and based on a specific curatorial thesis. I don’t believe that the same type of visual accompaniment will necessarily be as successful as it may have been in previous works. I think it’s a matter of finding a way to present the painting in a more sophisticated way that lives up to the content of the writing. Something that can be punchy, but subtle as well. More powerful than it is glib (but still a little glib). And I also need to decide whether to embrace or abandon the insect/arachnid/creepy-crawly motif that has pervaded these pieces so far.
This piece is completely different from those pieces, but for the sake of upholding the curator’s expectations it also has to be a little bit the same. I need to find a way to diverge sufficiently from the progression of my previous works to satisfy myself and the integrity (hah) of this unique product, but still retain enough of an essence of them to create a visually compelling result.
I am optimistic.

Anthony Burrill

True words.
I’m working on a piece for an upcoming show at Eyelevel Gallery (opening reception June 7th!) and trying to reacquaint myself with the notion of deadlines. This is the first time I’ve worked towards a deadline since I graduated university, and it’s bringing up all sorts of old problems & exciting pressures (I think I work well this way). There is nothing quite like the feeling of jumping into a project headfirst with a half-formed notion of what the finished product is going to look like and knowing you have, essentially, a few days to see it through to a completed state.

I’ve been dredging old public record family court transcripts for material for this piece (depressing, don’t ever do this if you get sad as easily as I do) in an attempt to use my own curatorial ‘voice’ to present legalese and court evidence through a poetic narrative. The show’s curator is looking for me to display this in a similar fashion to other text pieces that I’ve done - paired with large and colourful painted images - but I’m hitting a roadblock in terms of how to proceed with sourcing my image.

My work up until this point has relied on punchy one-liners, ambiguous one-off slogans that are meant to act as a kind of sticky non-sequitur. They are meant to be brief, temporal, and varying degrees of esoteric. For these reasons, the colourful, “seductive” (someone else’s words, not mine - but I’ll take it) images work as a successful complement to the text. The images are bold and large and colourful but are also basic, pared down representations, painted sparely, as equally simple and on-their-surface staightforward as the text.

However, the text for this piece is longer, more complex in its construction/presentation and based on a specific curatorial thesis. I don’t believe that the same type of visual accompaniment will necessarily be as successful as it may have been in previous works. I think it’s a matter of finding a way to present the painting in a more sophisticated way that lives up to the content of the writing. Something that can be punchy, but subtle as well. More powerful than it is glib (but still a little glib). And I also need to decide whether to embrace or abandon the insect/arachnid/creepy-crawly motif that has pervaded these pieces so far.

This piece is completely different from those pieces, but for the sake of upholding the curator’s expectations it also has to be a little bit the same. I need to find a way to diverge sufficiently from the progression of my previous works to satisfy myself and the integrity (hah) of this unique product, but still retain enough of an essence of them to create a visually compelling result.

I am optimistic.

(Source: printeresting)

52 notes

slantedshanty:

Bruce Andrews, from EDGE

slantedshanty:

Bruce Andrews, from EDGE

(via slantedshanty-deactivated201404)

19 notes

Survival Series- Jenny Holzer

Survival Series- Jenny Holzer

1,275 notes

"Oh my god. That’s the whole thing. That’s three weeks of work."

Accurate.

I projected my new animation tonight as part of the closing reception for Ease Down the Road/The Living is Easy. I shot it at 12 frames per second but we sped it up to 24 frames for a total of a sixteen-second long video (and three odd weeks of work…) The video played on a loop and little kids attended the reception and tittered at the language.
It occurs to me that I really ought to take some courses on Final Cut and/or digital editing in general. Compression and resolution and codecs and keyframes, oh my! It gets confusing. It is amazing to have a technical supervisor like Elli on board who is both extremely smart and extremely helpful - and knows what to do when the projector doesn’t recognize the (very standard .mov) file format, or doesn’t remember how to loop.
Thank you Elli, thank you Amanda, thank you John.
I’m going to be doing some real documenting of my work tomorrow - so photos soon! And there were some photos taken of the reception tonight, so I’m going to try to nab those too…

I projected my new animation tonight as part of the closing reception for Ease Down the Road/The Living is Easy. I shot it at 12 frames per second but we sped it up to 24 frames for a total of a sixteen-second long video (and three odd weeks of work…) The video played on a loop and little kids attended the reception and tittered at the language.

It occurs to me that I really ought to take some courses on Final Cut and/or digital editing in general. Compression and resolution and codecs and keyframes, oh my! It gets confusing. It is amazing to have a technical supervisor like Elli on board who is both extremely smart and extremely helpful - and knows what to do when the projector doesn’t recognize the (very standard .mov) file format, or doesn’t remember how to loop.

Thank you Elli, thank you Amanda, thank you John.

I’m going to be doing some real documenting of my work tomorrow - so photos soon! And there were some photos taken of the reception tonight, so I’m going to try to nab those too…